The Colors of Infinity

6

November 5, 2010 by Willy Cardoso

ATTENTION

THESE VIDEOS BELOW HAVE (AT A FIRST GLANCE) NOTHING TO DO WITH EDUCATION, TEACHING, ENGLISH, OR ANYTHING ELSE YOU’RE USED TO SEEING ON THIS BLOG. Apart from a connection to Chaos Theory which I have mentioned once or twice.

However, they’re INCREDIBLE.

I wouldn’t use so much space here if they weren’t. In fact, I can say it, singular, because it’s one video split in six parts.

Put the teacherish things aside, put kids to bed, get a glass of wine and discover order out of chaos among clouds, flocks, mountain ranges, e-picture compression, and whatever else your eyes can find.

Welcome to the wonderland of Fractal Geometry, the Mandelbrot Set and its colors of infinity.

 

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6 thoughts on “The Colors of Infinity

  1. David Warr says:

    Thanks Willy. Have watched them all, 3 this morning, 3 just now. I love fractals too. At first glance not linked to teaching… I’ve got a few ideas, they may take shape in my sleep. What are your ideas on linking it?
    David

    • For me, it’s still just an interesting metaphor.
      – Even in seemingly chaos it is possible to find a bit of order. Learning processes becoming learning theories
      – Small things (in this case the formula), can generate incredible and unpredictable outcomes (the shapes). You can predict the outcomes of a ‘teaching action’
      – A lot of language learning is caused by (re)iteration, which is the basis of the Mandelbrot set.
      – Small units that become larger and larger – not only changing, but also feeding back to the system – is also claimed to be an effective way to organize for learning.
      – Although it might take centuries, finding a formula to anything seems possible through this example.

      Very interesting, though out of my scope, is the use of fractals in applied linguistics.

      Zipf (1935) showed that power-laws affect the frequency of use of words in any human language. A power-law signals a relationship, usually between two variables, which is scale-free. Zipf demonstrated that in texts of various lengths, there is an inverse relationship between the frequency of occurrence of a word and its frequency rank so that relatively few words occur often while others are comparatively rare. (in Larsen-Freeman and Cameron 2008:109)

      It gets a lot more complicated than that, I didn’t understand it, or I rather say I didn’t have the time to understand it. πŸ˜‰
      But if interested search for ‘Zipf’s Law’, it’s quite mind-boggling.

      Just another interesting quote from the same source.
      ‘Conceivably there are fractals in other language-using patterns, because every time a language user uses a pattern it affects the probability with which the pattern is used in the future’

  2. […] me proud to be alive and part of this wonderful universe that Willy is so excited about too in his Authentic Teaching. I’ve cheated here and used a language plant I’ve used before by Maya Angelou, but it does […]

  3. thoughts

    Video 1
    first 3 minutes:

    It looks like a buddha. It reminds me of mandelas.

    end…
    It really does. Will watch rest of videos later. There’s a book I’m thinking off that was on the back-packer circuit when I was young. I will try to think of its title.

    more later after I was afraid to press post-comment without looking like an idiot.
    It would seem I am not the only one πŸ™‚

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhabrot

    • wow, with a bit of creativity or some say clinical eye, you can find the whole world in the fractals πŸ˜‰
      I particularly like the seahorse.

      It’s funny y’know, yesterday I was walking in the woods and couldn’t stop looking for fractals in the vegetation, this thing gets you bonkers man!

  4. A C Clarke, like the slightly scarey grandfather you still wish you’d had. Thank for keeping me up late, Willy. That was infinitely satisfying
    Dan x
    ;o)

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